tobacco hornworm

We Need to Talk About Tomato Hornworm

First things first: I don’t have tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata) in my own garden. What you see above is a photo that I took a few weekends ago of a Tobacco Hornworm (Manduca sexta) fatting itself up on my tomatoes. The caterpillars of these two distinct species of moth look very much alike and are

Lily Beetle

Let’s Talk About Lily Beetles with Dianna Gibson

Over the last few years, gardening friends have been warning me about a garden scourge the seems to be new(ish) to my area. The lily beetle (Lilioceris lilii) is a pretty red and black beetle that defoliates just about anything in the Lily family, but seems to focus on Asiatics, Fritillaria, Soloman’s Seal, as well

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Make Your Own Fruit Fly Carrousel

Perhaps it is the cold weather that brings them indoors in droves or a last push to procreate before the end times come, but the fruit flies are taking over my kitchen right now as they do every single fall. They are everywhere. They settle on anything that doesn’t move (edible or not) and alight

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

TO Bees

We are excited about hosting a wild bee nesting box in our new garden as a part of a study on wild bee populations in urban habitats that is being conducted by Scott McIvor through the Packer Collection (PCYU) at York University. You can see how the nestboxes are constructed here. We can’t wait to

Photo by Gayla Trail  All Rights Reserved

Wasp Invasion!

I haven’t noticed it to be quite the exaggerated horror film some are saying, but apparently Toronto is in the midst of a yellow jacket population explosion. The increase is thought to be the result of the combination of a cool, wet season, and the recently resolved garbage strike. All-in-all there’s just a lot more

Photo by Gayla Trail All Rights Reserved

Mantis Watch 2009

As previously mentioned, I bought a praying mantis egg case at the Parkdale Horticultural Society Plant Sale the other day. It’s not exactly the most effective form of pest prevention in the garden for a few reasons: 1. Praying mantids are not discerning and will eat any and all insects in the garden, including the

Lady Bug Larvae Photo by Gayla Trail

Your Questions Answered: Ladybug Confusion

Question: I just saw my first yellow and black ladybug! I live in Germany, but previously lived in North Carolina. Are the yellow and black ladybugs more common in Europe? – Kayla Answer: Yes, yellow and black ladybugs are native to Europe but can be found (although less often) in North America too. The Common

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