Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

My Garden in July (2011)

Oh dear. I really have been remiss in providing updates and photos of the garden in its first year. The last photo I posted was on June 29. We were headed to Denver and I wanted a record of it before I left. Until that time June was still a bit wet and sometimes cold.

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

A Few Film Photos Taken in the Alpine Garden at the Denver Botanic

The large inflorescence in the background of this photo belongs to Agave parryi, an agave that can be hardy to -18C (according to “High and Dry: Gardening with Cold-Hardy Dryland Plants” by Robert Nold), depending on the growing conditions. Recently, I have been learning about some of the hardier agaves and was pleased to see

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Alpine Flowers at Mount Evans, Colorado

As promised, a follow-up post of closeup shots taken at the Mount Goliath alpine garden. While I had to exclude hundreds of shots to keep this post within reason, I still managed to go overboard with over 30 images. As a result, I have embedded a slideshow so that those of you with a slow

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Japanese Mountain Lily

I was supposed to post a follow up to my journey above the tree line today; however, we are experiencing a heatwave that has made my office uninhabitable. Instead, to give myself a reprieve from this heat, I am posting a few shots of this gorgeous lily that I took in my garden just before

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Above the Tree Line

How cool to be so high I could actually see where the trees stopped. Just like that. No more trees. While in Denver, a friend of ours (thanks Ross!) generously offered to take us up to Mt. Goliath, an alpine area that is managed by the Denver Botanic Gardens. As an alpine plant fan this

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Pink and Yellow Radishes

This year I decided to try two new radishes in my newly built raised beds and have had equal success with both. The first is ‘Zlata’ a small radish from Poland that is generously described as soft yellow (and often Photoshopped that way in online seed catalogues), but in my opinion turned out something much

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

The Aliens Have Landed

Stemless Thistle (Onopordum acaulon), hands down the most memorable plant of our trip to Denver. I REALLY want to grow this one in my own garden and am now looking for some seeds to purchase.* I have a soft spot for thistles, so much so that I won’t pull the wild growing ones when they

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Chance Xeriscaping

This image functions as a good demonstration of just how dry gardening is in Denver without the benefit of a hose. This landscape is nothing more than a random scattering of common mullein (Verbascum thapsus) with a few hot pink-flowered hollyhocks and dry land grasses thrown in. I’m not even sure it qualifies as a

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Nylon Hedgehog Cactus

Davin and I were taken with this flowering cactus (Echinocereus viridiflorus) in the Alpine Garden at the Denver Botanic Gardens. Here’s an in context shot so that you can see how the plant was growing in a stone trough. I looked the genus up on the United States Department of Agriculture Plants Database and was

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

Colorado on the Way to Nebraska

Yesterday we drove to Nebraska to see some fields. That was not a difficult task to achieve and is in keeping with what I expected. But what has surprised me on this trip is just how dry it is here. Take this picture, shot in Colorado on the way back from Nebraska. This is High

Photo by Gayla Trail: All Rights Reserved

My Mind is Blown at the Denver Botanic

This one is a little taste for my friend Barry who really wants to make it to see the alpine garden at the Denver Botanic Garden, someday. I have no idea, but WHAT? The aliens are here. This last shot is of the “Ponderosa Garden” near the entrance. Denver is incredible. I am loving it